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Electronic Structure of Metal Surfaces

  • J. E. Inglesfield
Part of the Physics of Solids and Liquids book series (PSLI)

Abstract

In this chapter we describe the electronic structure of clean metal surfaces, and the relationship between this and the physical properties. It is important, after all, to understand the physics of clean surfaces before we can understand their interaction with atoms and molecules. There is also a lot of inherently interesting physics in surface electronic structure, particularly its relationship with the bulk. We shall concern ourselves with the types of wave function which can occur at surfaces, localized surface states, as well as bulk wave functions reflected by the surface, the change in electronic charge distribution which contributes to the work function, and changes in bonding which lead to the surface energy and the displacement of atoms at the surface.

Keywords

Schroedinger Equation Jellium Model Bulk Plasmon Tamm State Surface Electronic Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Inglesfield
    • 1
  1. 1.SERC Daresbury LaboratoryWarringtonEngland

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