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The Nutritional Importance of Pure and Mixed Cultures of Yeasts in the Development of Drosophila mulleri Larvae in Opuntia Tissues and its Relationship to Host Plant Shifts

  • William T. Starmer
  • Virginia Aberdeen
Part of the Monographs in Evolutionary Biology book series (MEBI)

Abstract

The prevalence of yeasts in the diets of Drosophila species has stimulated studies on the role of yeasts in almost all aspects of the biology of Drosophila. The early work of Del-court and Guyenot (1910) and Baumberger (1919) on the nutritional importance of yeasts for Drosophila was followed in the middle of the 20th century by two major research efforts. One was primarily concerned with the nutritional value of yeasts to Drosophila in the laboratory (reviewed by Sang, 1978) while the other was directed toward understanding the evolutionary biology of natural populations of Drosophila species by studying their natural food, yeasts (reviewed by Begon, 1982). Both lines of investigation suggested that the two organisms depend on one another for survival. The dependencies are basically mutualistic. The yeasts rely on insects such as Drosophila species for dispersal to new habitats while the Drosophila rely on the yeasts for nutrition during larval development and egg maturation.

Keywords

Drosophila Species Free Sugar Fruit Tissue Sonoran Desert Nutritional Importance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • William T. Starmer
    • 1
  • Virginia Aberdeen
    • 1
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentSyracuse UniversitySyracuseUSA

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