Advertisement

Storage and Transfer Systems

  • Klaus D. Timmerhaus
  • Thomas M. Flynn
Part of the The International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

A critical component of any cryogenic system is the manner in which the fluid is to be stored and transported. Storage-vessel and transfer-line design for such systems has become rather routine as a result of the wide use and application of cryogenic fluids. Such vessels for these fluids range in size from 1-liter flasks used in the laboratory for liquid nitrogen to 160,000-m3 double-walled tanks for temporary storage of liquefied natural gas before being transported to overseas destinations. These storage vessels for cryogenic fluids range in type from low-performance containers, insulated with rigid foam, cork, or fibrous insulation to high-performance containers insulated with evacuated multilayer insulations. The overriding factor in the type of container chosen normally is one of economics and safety. It is just common sense to select a higher-performance container for storing more expensive cryogenic fluids because the loss rate is minimized.

Keywords

Heat Transfer Rate Outer Line Heat Leak Liquid Oxygen Storage Vessel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    P. Peterson, Sartryek ur TVF 29(4), 11 (1958).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    C. R. Lindquist and L. R. Niendorf, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 8, Plenum Press, New York, 1963, p. 398.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    I. A. Black and P. E. Glaser, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Plenum Press, New York, 1966, p. 26.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    C. L. Tien and A. J. Stretton, Heat and Mass Transfer in Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Hemisphere Publishing Company, New York, 1987, p. 3.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. Nusselt and Z. Bayer, Revisions-ver., Nos. 13 and 14 (1913).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. R. Cunnington and C. L. Tien. Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 22, Plenum Press, New York, 1977, p. 263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section VIII. Unfired Pressure Vessels, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 1983.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    R. F. Barron, Cryogenic Systems, 2nd ed., Oxford University Press, New York, 1985, p. 362, 369.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    A. E. Germeles, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 22, Plenum Press, New York, 1977, p. 326.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    D. F. Gluck and J. F. Kline, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 7, Plenum Press, New York, 1962, p. 219.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    H. Berndt, R. Doll, U. John, and W. Wiedermann, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol.33, Plenum Press, New York, 1988, p. 1147.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    W. G. Steward, Cryogenics 26, 97 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    M. DiPirro and M. Castles, Cryogenics 26, 84 (1986).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    ASA Code for Pressure Piping, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, New York, 1983.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    D. H. Liebenberg, R. W. Stokes, and F. J. Edeskuty, Advances in Cryogenic Engineering, Vol. 11, Plenum Press, New York, 1966, p. 554.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    O. Baker, Oil Gas J. 53(12), 185 (1954).Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    R. C. Martinelli and D. B. Nelson, Trans. ASME 70, 695 (1948).Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    R. C. Martinelli and R. W. Lockhart, Chem. Eng. Prog. 45(1), 39 (1949).Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    R. B. Stewart, Ph.D. thesis, The University of Iowa, 1966.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus D. Timmerhaus
    • 1
  • Thomas M. Flynn
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  2. 2.Ball Aerospace Systems GroupBoulderUSA

Personalised recommendations