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Proteins and Nucleotide Sequences Involved in DNA Replication of Filamentous Bacteriophage

  • K. Geider
  • T. F. Meyer
  • I. Bäumel
  • A. Reimann
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 179)

Abstract

Filamentous bacteriophages (fd, M13, f1) contain single-stranded circular DNA of about 6400 bases (1). They penetrate the host cell via pili induced by the F-episome of an Escherichia coli cell. During the penetration process their single-stranded genome is converted into double-stranded DNA which is the main viral component in the first minutes after infection. Later in the life cycle, viral single strands are formed and complexed with gene 5 protein. They are assembled in the host membrane into phage particles, which penetrate the cell wall without severe damage of the host. Filamentous phages are quite flexible on the size of the DNA to be packaged. They spontaneously generate miniphages of about 1 kb (2, 3), but they can also comprise artificial DNA sequences up to a length of 15 kb, if the phage packaging signal is provided (4).

Keywords

Replication Origin Phage Particle Complementary Strand Filamentous Phage Viral Strand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Geider
    • 1
  • T. F. Meyer
    • 1
  • I. Bäumel
    • 1
  • A. Reimann
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung Molekulare BiologieMax-Planck-Institut für medizinische ForschungHeidelbergFederal Republic of Germany

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