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The Origin of DNA Replication of Bacteriophage fl and its Interaction with the Phage Gene II Protein

  • Gian Paolo Dotto
  • Kensuke Horiuchi
  • Norton D. Zinder
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 179)

Abstract

The origin of DNA replication of bacteriophage fl consists of two functional domains: 1) a “core region”, about 40 nucleotides long, that is absolutely required for viral (plus) strand replication and contains three distinct but partially overlapping signals, a) the recognition sequence for the viral gene II protein, which is necessary for both initiation and termination of viral strand synthesis, b) the termination signal, which extends for 8 more nucleotides on the 5’ side of the gene II protein recognition sequence, c) the initiation signal that extends for about 10 more nucleotides on the 3’ side of the gene II protein recognition sequence; 2) a “secondary region”, 100 nucleotides long, required exclusively for plus strand initiation. Disruption of the “secondary region” does not completely abolish the functionality of the fl origin but does drastically reduce it (1% residual biological activity). This region, however, can be made entirely dispensable by mutations elsewhere in the phage genome.

Keywords

Cold Spring Harbor Phage Genome Strand Synthesis Replicative Form Minus Strand 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gian Paolo Dotto
    • 1
  • Kensuke Horiuchi
    • 1
  • Norton D. Zinder
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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