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Search for Bound N̄N States Using a Precision Gamma and Charged Pion Spectrometer at Lear(PS183)

  • A. Angelopoulos
  • A. Apostolakis
  • T. Armstrong
  • L. B. Auerbach
  • B. Bassalleck
  • C. Bromberg
  • B. D. Dieterle
  • V. Highland
  • C. P. Leavitt
  • R. A. Lewis
  • M. Mandelkern
  • W. K. McFarlane
  • R. J. Miller
  • B. Y. Oh
  • P. Papaelias
  • L. Price
  • H. Rozaki
  • D. Schultz
  • J. Schultz
  • G. A. Smith
  • M. Spyropoulou-Stassinaki
  • G. Vassiliades
  • R. Von Lintig
  • J. Whitmore
  • D. M. Wolfe
Part of the Ettore Majorana International Science Series book series (EMISS, volume 17)

Abstract

This experiment will use a magnetic spectrometer to search for monoenergetic γ and π ± transitions between bound N̄N states. The spectrometer is instrumented with drift chambers, proportional wire chambers, and scintillation counters. Gamma-rays produced in a 20 cm long LH2 target are materialized by a 5% converter located in the magnetic field with a geometrical acceptance (ΔΩ/4π) of ~ 2–6×10-3 (100–400 MeV) and 6×10-3 (>400 MeV). Trajectories of bent electron-positron pairs and π ± , as well as the remaining associated charged annihilation products, are measured in the various chambers. The resultant gamma-ray energy resolution is expected to be better than 1.5% FWHM over the full range of energies studied. To illustrate the sensitivity of this experiment, a y line at 300 MeV produced at the level Rγ = Γγ/ΓA = 10-4 will appear as a six standard deviation effect after an exposure of 5×1011 p̄’s.

Keywords

Scintillation Counter Drift Chamber Anode Wire Proportional Chamber Geometrical Acceptance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    PSCC/80–93/P 24; 80–136/P 24/Add.l;81–7/P 24/Add.2.Google Scholar
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    See G.A. Smith, “An Experimentalist’s View of Antiproton Physics”, to be published in the proceedings of the LAMPF II Workshop, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Feb.1–4, 1982 and references cited therein.Google Scholar
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    J.C. Alder et al., Nucl. Instr. and Methods, 160, 93 (1979).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    D.I. Lowenstein et al., IV European Antiproton Symposium, Editions Du Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique, Paris, Vol.11, p.669 and Phys. Rev. D, 23, 2788 (1981).ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    F. Sauli, CERN 77–09 (1977).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Angelopoulos
    • 1
  • A. Apostolakis
    • 1
  • T. Armstrong
    • 3
  • L. B. Auerbach
    • 5
  • B. Bassalleck
    • 4
  • C. Bromberg
    • 3
  • B. D. Dieterle
    • 4
  • V. Highland
    • 5
  • C. P. Leavitt
    • 4
  • R. A. Lewis
    • 3
  • M. Mandelkern
    • 2
  • W. K. McFarlane
    • 5
  • R. J. Miller
    • 3
  • B. Y. Oh
    • 3
  • P. Papaelias
    • 1
  • L. Price
    • 2
  • H. Rozaki
    • 1
  • D. Schultz
    • 2
  • J. Schultz
    • 2
  • G. A. Smith
    • 3
  • M. Spyropoulou-Stassinaki
    • 1
  • G. Vassiliades
    • 1
  • R. Von Lintig
    • 5
  • J. Whitmore
    • 3
  • D. M. Wolfe
    • 4
  1. 1.Athens CollaborationGreece
  2. 2.U.C. Irvine CollaborationUSA
  3. 3.Michigan State CollaborationUSA
  4. 4.New Mexico CollaborationUSA
  5. 5.Temple CollaborationUSA

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