Kinetics of Tracer Efflux from Leaves

  • Donald B. Fisher
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 4)


I must admit to ambivalent feelings in presuming to address this group on some of the more theoretical aspects of translocation. My approach to translocation is primarily experimental and my contributions to theory have been only modest, to put it generously. To some degree, this is a matter of choice, because I think the most pressing problems for translocation are experimental ones. A theoretical approach, and I am speaking here essentially of a modelling approach, quickly leads to a need for information which is either shaky or or simply non-existent. But one of the most important reasons for this state of affairs is that experimentalists frequently lack a sufficient knowledge of theoretical aspects to make the most useful kind of observations or to appreciate that some required observations have not been made at all. Consequently, I feel that there should be an intimate relationship between experimentation and modelling. For that reason, I’ve had some difficulty in dividing the material into separate presentations. To the degree to which that difficulty becomes apparent, I will have made a point, although I hope that it’s not one that gets overdone.


Impulse Response Function Sieve Tube Incremental Volume Morning Glory Palisade Parenchyma 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald B. Fisher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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