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Gaba-Acetylcholine Interaction in the Rat Striatum

  • B. Scatton
  • G. Bartholini
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 25)

Abstract

The corpus striatum contains a massive cholinergic innervation which is mainly of intrinsic origin. Evidence has been provided that striatal acetylcholine (ACh) (inter)neurons may be regulated by the afferent nigrostriatal dopaminergic (13, 25) and raphe-striatal serotonergic pathways (5). Little is known, however, of a possible regulation of cholinergic neurons by GABA. Previous studies with Picrotoxin have suggested that GABA may affect the activity of cholinergic neurons indirectly via changes in the activity of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway (10,12). Recent data obtained in our laboratory have also indicated the existence of a GABA-mediated inhibitory influence on cholinergic cells which is intrinsic to the striatum (17 18, 20). The present report reviews the available evidence for, and analyzes the possible functional implications of, this intrastriatal GABA-ACh link.

Keywords

Cholinergic Neuron Cholinergic Cell Nipecotic Acid Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Pathway Gaba Receptor Agonist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Scatton
    • 1
  • G. Bartholini
    • 1
  1. 1.Research DepartmentSynthelabo-L.E.R.S.ParisFrance

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