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A Vesicular Site of Origin for the Release of a Cholinergic False Transmitter at the Torpedo Synapse

  • Y. A. Luqmani
  • V. P. Whittaker
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 25)

Abstract

The morphological studies of Ceccarelli, Heuser (2,6) and others (for review see 14) have shown convincingly the increased occurrence of exocytotic profiles (of vesicles fusing with the presynaptic membrane) during induced activity at the neuromuscular function. Vesicle recycling is apparent from the inclusion of extracellular markers, observed in a number of tissues (5,11,15), but this does not necessarily prove that transmitter-containing vesicles undergo a similar process. Similarly, biochemical studies involving a comparison of the degree of radiolabelling of acetylcholine (ACh) in subcellular pools with that of stimulus-released transmitter, has also been subject to major difficulties of interpretation.

Keywords

Electric Organ High Frequency Stimulation Acetate Ester Vesicle Recycling Vesicle Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. A. Luqmani
    • 1
  • V. P. Whittaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung NeurochemieMax-Planck-Institut fur Biophysikalische ChemieGottingenFR Germany

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