Advertisement

The Cyanide-Resistant Oxidase in Higher Plant Mitochondria

  • James N. Siedow
  • Deborah A. Berthold
  • Donald J. Fluke
  • Mary E. Musgrave
  • Steven J. Stegink

Summary

Recent work in our laboratory has served to characterize several features associated with different aspects of the cyanide-resistant, “alternative” pathway of electron flow in higher plant mitochondria.
  1. 1.

    In binding studies carried out using a radioactively labeled inhibitor of the alternative pathway (14C-Iabeled butyl gallate), the gallate binding site is, in most all cases, a constitutive component of the plant mitochondrial electron transfer chain; even in those plant mitochondria which, as isolated, are fully cyanide sensitive.

     
  2. 2.

    In two varieties of pea that have been shown previously to either have (cv. Alaska) or lack (cv. Progress No. 9) the alternative pathway, genetic crosses indicate a distinctly maternal pattern of inheritance to the alternative pathway, suggesting that the mitochondrial genome contributes to some aspect of the expression of the pathway.

     
  3. 3.

    Radiation inactivation analysis of the cyanide-resistant hydroxamate-sensitive duroquinol oxidase activity in isolated skunk cabbage mitochondria gives a dose for 37% inactivation in the range 17.7-15.9 Mrad. This corresponds to a functional molecular weight for the alternative oxidase of 36,000-40,000.

     

Keywords

Alternative Pathway Alternative Oxidase Plant Mitochondrion Leuconostoc Mesenteroides Bean Hypocotyl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Siedow, J.N., and Berthold, D.A. (1986) Physiol. Plant. 66, 569–573CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Moore, A.L., and Rich, P.R. (1985) in: Higher Plant Cell Respiration (Douce, R., and Day, D.A. eds) pp 134–172, Springer-Verlag, BerlinCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Siedow, J.N., and Girvin, M.E. (1980) Plant Physiol. 65, 669–674CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Siedow, J.N. (1982) in: Recent Advances in Phytochemistry, (Creasy, L.L. and Hrazdina, G. eds) Vol. 16, pp 47–83, Plenum Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bonner, W.D., Jr., Clarke, S.D., and Rich, P.R. (1986) Plant Physiol. 80, 838–842CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cottingham, I.R., and Moore, A.L. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 724, 191–200CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ragan, C.I., and Cottingham, I.R. (1985) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 811, 13–31Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Stegink, S.J., and Siedow, J.N. (1986) Plant Physiol. 80, 196–201CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Musgrave, M.E., and Siedow, J.N. (1986) Physiol. Plant. 64, 161–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Musgrave, M.E., Murfet, I.e., and Siedow, J.N. (1986) Plant, Cell & Environ. 9, 153–156CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Edwards, D.L., Rosenberg, E., and Maroney, P.A. (1974) J. Biol. Chem. 249, 3551–3556Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Bertrand, H., Argan, C.A., and Szakacs, N.A. (1983) in: Mitochondria 1983 (Schweyen, R.J., Wolf, K., and Kaudewitz, F., eds) pp 495–507, Walter de Gruyter & Co., BerlinGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Jung, C.Y. (1984) in: Receptor Biochemistry and Methodology (Venter, J.C., and Harrison, L.C., eds) Vol.3, pp 193–208, Alan R. Liss, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Kepner, G.R., and Macey, R.I. (1968) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 163, 188- 203CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Olive, C. and Levy, H.R. (1971) J. Biol. Chem. 246, 2043–2046Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Solomonson, L.P., and McCreery, M.J. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 806- 811Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • James N. Siedow
    • 1
  • Deborah A. Berthold
    • 1
  • Donald J. Fluke
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mary E. Musgrave
    • 1
  • Steven J. Stegink
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of BotanyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Departments of ZoologyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

Personalised recommendations