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Free (Unconjugated) Catecholamine Concentrations in Platelets: Biological Significance and Clinical Implications

  • G. B. Picotti
  • G. P. Bondiolotti
  • A. M. Cesura
  • C. Ravazzani
  • M. D. Galva
  • P. Mantegazza
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 164)

Abstract

Mammalian platelets do not contain monoamine synthesizing enzymes, but take up and accumulate in their “dense bodies”, the serotonin (5-HT) organelles, monoamines present in plasma, e.g. 5-HT, catecholamines (CA), normetanephrine and p-octopamine (Da Prada et al., 1980; for review see Da Prada et al., 1981). The limits of sensitivity of the fluorimetric methods used in earlier studies (Weil-Malherbe and Bone, 1975; Markwardt, 1976) for measuring the low concentrations of plasma and platelet CA have recently been overcome by highly sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assays, which allow precise and simultaneous measurements of adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA) and dopamine (DA) in minute platelet (from 1 to 2.5 ml of platelet rich plasma) and plasma (<0.1 ml) samples (Da Prada and Picotti, 1979). These methods applied to platelet extracts submitted to acid hydrolysis have also made it possible to establish the presence of substantial amounts of conjugated CA in human but not in animal platelets (Da Prada et al., 1980).

Keywords

Cold Exposure Restraint Stress Blood Platelet Storage Pool Neuroblastoma Tumor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. B. Picotti
    • 1
  • G. P. Bondiolotti
    • 1
  • A. M. Cesura
    • 1
  • C. Ravazzani
    • 1
  • M. D. Galva
    • 1
  • P. Mantegazza
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Pharmacology, School of MedicineUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

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