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The Porin Regulon: A Paradigm for the Two-Component Regulatory Systems

  • James M. Slauch
  • Thomas J. Silhavy

Abstract

The major outer membrane proteins, OmpF and OmpC, serve as passive diffusion pores that allow small hydrophilic molecules to cross the outer membrane of Escherichia coli K-12. The total amount of OmpF plus OmpC remains essentially constant. However, the relative amount of each protein is differentially regulated at the transcriptional level by the two-component regulatory system composed of the inner membrane sensory component, EnvZ, and the transcriptional regulator, OmpR. This regulation is in response to the osmolarity of the growth medium. OmpF is predominantly produced in media of low osmolarity, whereas OmpC is preferentially synthesized in media of high osmolarity.

Keywords

High Osmolarity Major Outer Membrane Protein rpoA Mutation Porin Protein Periplasmic Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© R.G. Landes Company 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • James M. Slauch
  • Thomas J. Silhavy

There are no affiliations available

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