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Effects of Wet and Dry Flotation REST on Blood Pressure and Plasma Cortisol

  • John TurnerJr.
  • William Gerard
  • John Hyland
  • Pamela Nieland
  • Thomas Fine

Abstract

Flotation Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy (F-REST) has been used successfully in the treatment of several stress-related disorders (Fine & Turner, 1982, 1985a; Rzewnicki et al., 1990; Koula et al, 1990). In F-REST (henceforth, REST) an individual lies supinely in thermoneutral buoyant fluid with minimal photic, auditory and tactile stimulation (Lilly, 1977). Deep relaxation reportedly accompanies REST (A. Barabasz, M. Barabasz, Dyer & Rather, 1990; Turner & Fine, 1983; Suedfeld, Ballard & Murphy, 1983). Relaxation has been shown to be associated with decreased activity of the adrenal axis (Davidson et al., 1979; Michaels, Huber & McCann, 1979; Jevning, Wilson & Davidson, 1978; McGrady et al., 1981). Plasma Cortisol can be measured as an indicator of this axis, and levels have been shown to decrease during REST (Turner & Fine 1983; McGrady et al., 1987). In addition, a decrease in blood pressure has been a common finding in previous REST studies (Jacobs, Heilbronner & Stanley, 1985; Fine & Turner, 1982; Kristeller, Schwartz & Black, 1982; Suedfeld, Roy & Landon, 1982), indicating that, along with plasma Cortisol, blood pressure can be a reliable index of the REST effect.

Keywords

Plasma Cortisol State Anxiety Cortisol Response Tactile Stimulation Relaxation Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John TurnerJr.
  • William Gerard
  • John Hyland
  • Pamela Nieland
  • Thomas Fine

There are no affiliations available

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