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Differential Effects of Wet and Dry Flotation REST on EEG Frequency and Amplitude

  • Thomas Fine
  • Donna Mills
  • John TurnerJr.

Abstract

During the last decade there have been numerous studies examining physiological processes altered during human exposure to brief flotation REST. These studies have examined heart rate (Turner & Fine, 1985a; Belinson & Forgays, 1985), muscle tension (Jacobs, Heilbronner, & Stanley, 1985; Fine & Turner, 1987), blood pressure (Fine & Turner, 1982; Jacobs, Heilbronner, & Stanley, 1985; McGrady et al, 1987; Turner et al., 1989) and various plasma and urinary endocrine measures (Turner & Fine, 1983, 1985, 1991; Turner et al., 1987; McGrady et al., 1987). Except for a study of EEG theta (Barabasz, 1990b), electrocortical activity in flotation REST has not been studied. Since it has been repeatedly demonstrated that brief flotation REST affects subjective experience and physiological processes it seems reasonable to postulate that it also may have somewhat specific effects on the electrical activity of the brain. Barabasz (1990b) found significantly increased theta after flotation REST.

Keywords

Average Amplitude Percent Time Nasal Cartilage Electrocortical Activity Frontal Placement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Fine
  • Donna Mills
  • John TurnerJr.

There are no affiliations available

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