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The 20 kDa APO-Polypeptide of the Chlorophyll a/b Protein Complex CP24

  • M. Spangfort
  • U. K. Larsson
  • U. Ljungber
  • M. Ryberg
  • B. Andersson
  • R. Klein
  • N. Wedel
  • R. G. Herrmann
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 168)

Summary

A 20 kDa polypeptide is shown to be the only chlorophyll-binding protein of CP24. Immunoblotting of thylakoid subfractions and immunogold electron microscopy of spinach leaf sections demonstrate that CP24 is located in the PSII-rich, appressed grana regions. A cDNA clone encoding the entire precursor protein (261 aa) was isolated. The CP24 apo-poly-peptide is nuclear encoded and is predicted to have two membrane spans with putative chlorophyll binding sites in regions which shows significant homology with LHC-II.

Keywords

Thylakoid Membrane Membrane Span Spinach Leave PSII Membrane Stroma Thylakoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Spangfort
    • 1
  • U. K. Larsson
    • 1
  • U. Ljungber
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Ryberg
    • 3
  • B. Andersson
    • 4
  • R. Klein
    • 2
  • N. Wedel
    • 2
  • R. G. Herrmann
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of LundSweden
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of StockholmSweden
  3. 3.Department of Plant PhysiologyUniversity of GöteborgSweden
  4. 4.Botanisches InstitutLudwig-Maximilians UniversitätMünchenGermany

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