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Chemical Carcinogenesis

A Long-Neglected Field Blossoms
  • Thomas H. MaughII
  • Jean L. Marx

Abstract

Chemicals—in the workplace, in the environment, and in the diet—may be the single most important cause of human cancers (Table 1). Many scientists estimate that at least 60 percent and perhaps as many as 90 percent of the 655,000 cases of cancer that will be discovered in the United States this year will have been caused by environmental factors, mostly chemicals. Almost 1000 chemicals have been reported to produce tumors in man or other animals, and many times that number are suspect.

Table 1

Some Chemicals That Are Recognized to Be Carcinogens in Humans

Chemicals

Sites of tumor formation

Certain tars, soots, and oils

Skin, lungs

Cigarette smoke

Lungs

2-Naphthylamine

Urinary bladder

4-Aminobiphenyl

Urinary bladder

Benzidine

Urinary bladder

N,N-bis(2-chloroethyl)-2-naphthylamine

Urinary bladder

Bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide

Lungs

Nickel compounds

Lungs, nasal sinuses

Chromium compounds

Lungs

Asbestos

Lungs, pleura

Keywords

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Microsomal Enzyme Sulfide Nickel Chemical Carcinogenesis Cancer Etiology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© American Association for the Advancement of Science 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas H. MaughII
  • Jean L. Marx

There are no affiliations available

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