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Activities of Enzymes of Purine and Pyrimidine Metabolism in Nine Mycoplasma Species

  • M. Hamet
  • C. Bonissol
  • P. Cartier
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 122B)

Abstract

Cultured fibroblasts are commonly used for studies of purine and pyrimidine metabolism and may be helpful for the prenatal diagnosis of enzyme deficiencies. Mycoplasmas, a common contaminant of cell cultures, are unable to realize “de novo” synthesis of purines and pyrimidines. It is necessary to add to the medium precursors such as free bases (guanine, uracil, thymine) or corresponding nucleosides or nucleotides in order to obtain a good growth in vitro. The study of the best medium composition shows that mycoplasmas possess active pathways of nucleotides degradation and bases salvage (1).

Keywords

Adenosine Deaminase Cytidine Deaminase Normal Human Fibroblast Skin Fibroblast Culture Final Protein Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    S. Razin: The mycoplasmas, Microbiol, Rev, 42:414 (1978).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    M. Barile: Mycoplasmal contamination of cell cultures. In Contamination in tissue culture, J. Fogh, ed. Academic Press, New York (1973).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. Hatanaka, R. Del Giudice, C. Long: Adenine formation from adenosine by mycoplasmas : adenosine Phosphorylase activity. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 72:1401 (1975).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hamet
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Bonissol
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Cartier
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiochimieCHU Necker-Enfants MaladesParisFrance
  2. 2.Laboratoire des MycoplasmesInstitut PasteurParisFrance

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