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Photosensitization of Organisms, with Special Reference to Natural Photosensitizers

  • Arthur C. Giese
Part of the Nato Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 34)

Abstract

Colorless cells, not appreciably absorbing visible light, are little affected by light passing through them because only light absorbed is capable of promoting a photochemical reaction. A photosensitizer is a molecule with a chromophore capable of absorbing light and transferring the energy to other molecules, themselves not capable of absorbing light.

Keywords

Methylene Blue Acridine Orange Rose BENGAL Photodynamic Action Wild Type Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur C. Giese
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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