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Sex Roles and Adolescent Drinking

  • Sharon C. Wilsnack
  • Richard W. Wilsnack

Abstract

In the United States, as in most other societies, men and boys drink more alcohol more frequently than do women and girls (Cahalan, Cisin, & Crossley, 1969; Child, Barry, & Bacon, 1965; Johnson, 1978; Rachal, Williams, Brehm, Cavanaugh, Moore, & Eckerman, 1975). The sex differences occur across all age levels, ethnic groups, and socioeconomic levels. The consistency of sex differences in drinking behavior suggests that drinking may be associated with traditional sex roles, that is, with traditional ideas about what constitutes appropriate and distinctive behavior for men and for women.

Keywords

Drinking Behavior Deviant Behavior Role Orientation Social Obligation Problem Consequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sharon C. Wilsnack
    • 1
  • Richard W. Wilsnack
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Department of NeuroscienceUniversity of North Dakota School of MedicineGrand ForksUSA
  2. 2.Department of SociologyUniversity of North DakotaGrand ForksUSA

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