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Alcohol Problems among Civilian Youth and Military Personnel

  • J. Michael Polich

Abstract

It is widely recognized that problems caused by alcohol are pervasive and costly in American society. Accompanying this recognition is a conviction, growing stronger in government circles, that young people are especially exposed to risks of harm from alcohol misuse (USDHEW, 1978). Yet there remain many unresolved questions connected with estimating such risks. Definitions of precisely what constitutes an “alcohol problem” are controversial. Data relating to the general youth population are scant. Little is known about the actual economic impact of the myriad disruptive behaviors linked to excessive drinking. These circumstances complicate the answers to a very basic prevalence question: How widespread and how serious are alcohol-related problems among young people?

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Alcohol Dependence Heavy Drinking Military Service Alcohol Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Michael Polich
    • 1
  1. 1.Social Science DepartmentThe Rand CorporationSanta MonicaUSA

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