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Behavioral Strategies for Reducing Drinking among Young Adults

  • Peter M. Miller

Abstract

Traditionally, alcoholism treatment programs have been geared toward middle-aged and older chronic alcoholics. For example, the median age of clients treated in the alcoholism treatment centers of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) throughout the United States is 45 years (Armor, Polich, & Stambul, 1976). Alcoholism prevention, on the other hand, has been aimed at the younger, school-aged segments of the population in the 12- to 17-year category.

Keywords

Drinking Behavior Blood Alcohol Concentration Moderate Drinking Excessive Drinking Blood Alcohol Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter M. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Behavioral MedicineHilton Head HospitalHilton Head IslandUSA

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