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Strategies for Reducing Drinking Problems among Youth: College Programs

  • David P. Kraft

Abstract

Drinking by college students in the United States has received increased attention from society over the past decade. The focus has become especially strong since the publication of the Second Special Report to the U.S. Congress on Alcohol and Health (U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1974), in which the increasing prevalence of drinking by junior-high- and high-school-aged youth and the high rate of drinking problems among college-aged youth were highlighted. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism responded by designing and implementing a series of activities called “The University ‘50 + 12’ Project” (Kraft, 1976, 1977). At the same time, many colleges and universities began their own programs to study the drinking practices and problems of students and to intervene effectively. As a result, many college and university campuses in the United States now have alcohol program activities designed to provide treatment for problem-drinking students, and some also seek to educate students about how to use alcoholic beverages in a safe manner.

Keywords

Alcoholic Beverage Drinking Behavior Alcohol Problem College Program Educational Approach 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • David P. Kraft
    • 1
  1. 1.Mental Health Division, University Health ServicesUniversity of MassachusettsAmherstUSA

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