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Basic Mechanisms and Local Feedback Control of Secretion of Adrenergic and Cholinergic Neurotransmitters

  • Lennart Stjärne
Part of the Handbook of Psychopharmacology book series (HBKPS, volume 6)

Abstract

The main aim in this chapter is to review recent evidence indicating that adrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmitter secretion may be subject to local feedback control. To understand the nature of the control mechanism, it is obviously essential to have a realistic picture of the controlled function. Thus before going into the evidence concerning physiological regulation of neurotransmitter secretion, certain crucial aspects of the available information concerning the basic processes involved in adrenergic and cholinergic transmitter secretion will be discussed. The intention is not to extensively review the literature in this vast field, but to point out what seem to be inconsistencies and discrepancies in current concepts concerning the basic processes involved in neurotransmitter secretion.

Keywords

Nerve Impulse Adrenergic Nerve Cholinergic Nerve Single Vesicle Sympathetic Nerve Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lennart Stjärne
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden

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