Advertisement

G

  • Douglas M. Considine
  • Glenn D. Considine

Keywords

Tall Fescue Peanut Butter Table Grape Kentucky Bluegrass Dairy Goat 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bajema, C. J. (editor): “Natural Selection in Human Populations: The Measurement of Ongoing Genetic Evolution in Contemporary Societies,” Wiley, New York (1971).Google Scholar
  2. Barish, N.: “The Gene Concept,” Van Nostrana Reinhold, New York (1965).Google Scholar
  3. Crick, F. H. C.: “The Genetic Code,” Sci. Amer., 207, 66–74 (October 1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Crick, F. H. C.: “The Genetic Code: III,” Sci. Amer., 215, 55 (October 1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Crosby, J. L.: “Computer Simulation in Genetics,” Wiley, New York (1973).Google Scholar
  6. Demerec, M. (editor): “Advances in Genetics,” multivolume works commenced in 1947 and added to periodically, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  7. Fraser, Alex: “Computer Genetics,” McGraw-Hill, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  8. Gardner, E. J.: “Principles of Genetics,” 4th edition, Wiley, New York (1972).Google Scholar
  9. Gisela, N.: “The Molecules of Life,” McGraw-Hill, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  10. Gottlieb, F. J.: “Developmental Genetics,” Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York (1965).Google Scholar
  11. Hartman, P. E., and S. R. Suskind: “Gene Action,” Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey (1965).Google Scholar
  12. Hayes, W.: “The Genetics of Bacteria and Their Viruses,” Wiley, New York (1964).Google Scholar
  13. Lewin, B. M.: “The Molecular Basis of Gene Expression,” Wiley, New York (1970).Google Scholar
  14. Nirenberg, M. W.: “The Genetic Code: II,” Sci. Amer., 208, 81–94 (March 1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Taylor, H. (editor): “Molecular Genetics,” Academic Press, New York (1963).Google Scholar
  16. Van Peene, H. J.: “Biochemical Genetics,” Charles C. Thomas, Springfield, Illinois (1966).Google Scholar
  17. Wagner, R. P. and H. K. Mitchell: “Genetics and Metabolism,” Wiley, New York (1964).Google Scholar
  18. Whittinghill, M.: “Human Genetics and Its Foundations,” Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York (1965).Google Scholar
  19. Brown, R. H.: “Goat Numbers-Most in Small Herds,” Feedstuffs, 32 (June 12, 1978).Google Scholar
  20. Deyoe, G. P., Ross, W. A., and W. H. Peters: “Raising Livestock,” McGraw-Hill, New York (1954).Google Scholar
  21. Ensminger, M. E.: “Animal Science,” The Interstate, Danville, Illinois (1962).Google Scholar
  22. Irmagrade, R. J.: “Modern Milk Goats,” Lippincott, Philadelphia. Of historical interest (1921).Google Scholar
  23. Staff: “Agricultural Statistics,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (issued annually).Google Scholar
  24. Staff: “Production Yearbook,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy (issued annually).Google Scholar
  25. Staff: “The Angora Goat,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C, (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  26. Staff: “Milk Goats,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  27. Staff: “Angora Goats,” American Angora Goat Breeders’ Association, Rocksprings, Texas (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  28. Staff: “Goat Breeding,” American Goat Society, Incorporated, Mena, Arkansas (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  29. Staff: “Milk Goats,” American Milk Goat Record Association, Boxtic, North Carolina (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  30. Bailey, L. H.: “Standard Cyclopedia of Horticulture,” Macmillan, New York (1963).Google Scholar
  31. Beutel, J. A., and W. J. Moller: “Berry Production,” Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California, Leaflet 2779 (1975).Google Scholar
  32. Magoon, C.: “Kiwifruit,” Fruit & Vegetable Facts & Pointers, United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association, Alexandria, Virginia (1979).Google Scholar
  33. Westcott, C.: “Plant Diseases Handbook,” 3rd Edition (Gooseberry: page 584), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York (1971).Google Scholar
  34. Benner, B.: “Tangelos,” United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association, Alexandria, Virginia (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  35. Kirkman, C. H., Jr.: “The Sunkist Adventure,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., FCS Information Bulletin 94 (1975).Google Scholar
  36. Nagy, S., Shaw, P. E., and M. K. Veldhuis: “Citrus Science and Technology,” Volumes 1 and 2, Avi, Westport, Connecticut (1977).Google Scholar
  37. Robinson, T. R.: “The Budsport Origin of a New Pink-fleshed Grapefruit in Florida,” J. Hered., 12, 194–198 (1921).Google Scholar
  38. Scott, W. C., and C. J. Hearn: “Processing Qualities of New Citrus Hybrids,” Proc. Florida State Hortic. Soc., 79, 304–306 (1966).Google Scholar
  39. Seelig, R. A.: “Grapefruit,” United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association, Alexandria, Virginia (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  40. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 2354: “California Grapefruit Industry,” (1977).Google Scholar
  41. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4011: “Citrus Growing in California,” (1977).Google Scholar
  42. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4012: “The Citrus Industry,” Volume 1. (Botany, Horticultural Varieties, Commercial Regions of the World), 600 pages (1967).Google Scholar
  43. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4013: “The Citrus Industry,” Volume 2. (Anatomy, Physiology, Mineral Nutrition, Seed Production, Genetics, Growth Regulators), 400 pages (1968).Google Scholar
  44. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4014: “The Citrus Industry,” Volume 3, (Propagation, Planting, Weed Control, Soil, Fertilization, Pruning, Irrigation, Climate, Frost Protection,” (1973).Google Scholar
  45. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4015: “Color Handbook of Citrus Diseases,” (1977).Google Scholar
  46. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 4019: “The Grapefruit: Its Composition, Physiology, and Products,” (1977).Google Scholar
  47. Staff: “Agricultural Statistics,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (Published annually).Google Scholar
  48. Tindall, H. D.: “Fruits and Vegetables in West Africa,” Food and Agriculture Organization (United Nations), Rome (1965).Google Scholar
  49. Watt, B. K., and A. L. Merrill: “Composition of Foods,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Agriculture Hand-book 8, (1975).Google Scholar
  50. Andres, C.: “Peanut Flours Provide Protein Plus High Function-ahty” Food Processing, 38, 5 (1977).Google Scholar
  51. Beuchat, L. R., and B. J. Nail: “Fermentation of Peanut Milk,” J. of Food Science, 43, (4) 1109–1112 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Cole, A. W., et al.: “Response of Selected Vegetable Crops (Peanut) and Weed Species to Herbicides,” Plant Pathology and Weed Science Agricultural Experiment Station, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, Mississippi. Report MIS-1235 (1976).Google Scholar
  53. Freeman, A. F., Morris, N. J., and R. K. Willich: “Peanut Butter,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (1954).Google Scholar
  54. McGill, F., and R. J. Henning: “Growing Peanuts in Georgia,” University of Georgia College of Agriculture, Athens, Georgia. Bulletin 640 (May 1973).Google Scholar
  55. McWatters, K. H., and C. T. Young: “Quality and Compositional Characteristics of Stabilized, Unstabilized, and Imitation Peanut Butter,”J. of Food Science, 43, (2) 370–374 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Mitchell, J. H., Jr., and R. K. Malphrus: “Lipid Oxidation in Spanish Peanuts: The Effect of Moist Heat Treatments,” J. of Food Science, 42, (6) 1457–1461 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Shewfelt, A. L., and C. T. Young: “Storage Stability of Peanut-based Foods: A Review,” J. of Food Science, 42, (5) 1148–1152 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. Staff: “Production Yearbook,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy (published annually).Google Scholar
  59. Staff: “Agricultural Statistics,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. (published annually).Google Scholar
  60. Staff: “Peanuts—Culture and Uses,” American Peanut Research and Education Association, Inc., New York (revised periodically).Google Scholar
  61. Thorburn, W. G.: “The Peanut Industry in India,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. Bulletin FAS-M-267 (September 1075).Google Scholar
  62. van Veen, A. G., Graham, D. C. W., and Steinkraus, K. H.: “Fermented Peanut Press Cake,” Cereal Science Today, 13, (3) 96 (1968).Google Scholar
  63. Woodruff, J. G.: “Peanuts: Production, Processing, Products,” Avi, Westport, Connecticut (1966).Google Scholar
  64. Christensen, L. P.: “Mechanical Harvesting of Grapes for the Winery,” Interim Publication, University of California Agricultural Extension Program, Davis, California (1977).Google Scholar
  65. Emerson, L. P. B.: “Grape Output in Mexico Rising Rapidly,” Foreign Agriculture, 17 (18) 16–17 (1979).Google Scholar
  66. Ferree, M. E.: “Muscadine Grape Culture,” University of Georgia College of Agriculture, Athens, Georgia, Bulletin 739, (1976).Google Scholar
  67. Flora, L. F.: “Processing and Quality Characteristics of Muscadine Grapes,”.Jof Food Science, 42 (4) 935–938 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Flora, L. F.: “Influence of Heat, Cultivar and Maturity on the Anthocyaninidin -3,5-Diglucosides of Muscadine Grapes,”, J. of Food Science, 43 (6) 1819–1821 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Hankinson, B., Rao, V. N. M., and C. J. B. Smit: “Viscoelastic and Histological Properties of Grape Skins,” J. of Food Science, 42 (3) 632–635 (1977).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Hrazdina, G.: “Anthyocyanin Composition of Concord Grapes,” Lebensm.-Wiss. Technol, 8, 111 (1975).Google Scholar
  71. McGrew, J. R.: “Control of Grape Diseases and Insects,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Farmers’ Bulletin 1893 (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  72. McGrew, J. R.: “Growing American Bunch Grapes,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Farmers’ Bulletin 2123 (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  73. Nesbitt, W. B., et al: “Relationship of Anthocyanins of Black Muscadine Grapes (Vitis rotundifolia Michx) to Wine Color,” Am. J. Enol Viticult., 25, 30 (1974).Google Scholar
  74. Seelig, R. A.: “Grapes,” United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association, Washington, D.C. (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  75. Staff: “Muscadine Grapes,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C. Farmers’ Bulletin 2157 (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  76. Staff: “Grape Standards for Marketing,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Consumer and Marketing Service, Washington, D.C. (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  77. Staff: “Amino Acid Content of Foods,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy Nutritional Studies, No. 24(1910). Google Scholar
  78. Watt, B. K., and A. L. Merrill: “Composition of Foods,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Agriculture Handbook 8 (1975).Google Scholar
  79. Benner, B.: “Tangelos,” United Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Association, Alexandria, Virginia (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  80. Kirkman, C. H., Jr.: “The Sunkist Adventure,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., FCS Information Bulletin 94 (1975).Google Scholar
  81. Nagy, S., Shaw, P. E., and M. K. Veldhuis: “Citrus Science and Technology,” Volumes 1 and 2, Avi, Westport, Connecticut (1977).Google Scholar
  82. Robinson, T. R.: “The Budsport Origin of a New Pink-fleshed Grape-fruit in Florida,”/. Hered., 12, 194–198 (1921).Google Scholar
  83. Scott, W. C, and C. J. Hearn: “Processing Qualities of New Citrus Hybrids,” Proc. Florida State Hortic. Soc, 79, 304–306 (1966).Google Scholar
  84. Seelig, R. A.: “Grapefruit,” United Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Association, Alexandria, Virginia (Revised periodically).Google Scholar
  85. Staff: Publications available from : Division of Agricultural Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, California: Publication 2354: “California Grapefruit Industry,” (1977). Publication 4011: “Citrus Growing in California,” (1977). Publication 4012: “The Citrus Industry,” Volume 1. (Botany).Google Scholar
  86. Brekke, J. E., and A. L. Myers: “Viscometric Behavior of Guava Purees and Concentrates,” J. of Food Science, 43 (1) 272–273 (1978).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. Nip, W. K.: “Development and Storage Stability of Drum-dried Guava- and Papaya-Taro Flakes,” J. of Food Science, 44 (1) 222–225 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Rao, M. A., and L. N. O. Palomino: “Flow Properties of Tropical Fruit Purees,” J. of Food Science, 39, 160 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. Staff: “Amino-Acid Content of Foods,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy Nutritional Study No. 24, (1970).Google Scholar
  90. Tindall, H. D.: “Fruits and Vegetables in West Africa,” Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome, Italy (1965).Google Scholar
  91. Watt, B. K., and A. L. Merrill: “Composition of Foods,” U.S. Department of Agriculture, Washington, D.C., Agriculture Handbook 8, (1975).Google Scholar
  92. Wescott, C.: “Plant Disease Handbook, 3rd Edition (Guava: page 590), Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York (1971).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas M. Considine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Glenn D. Considine
    • 3
  1. 1.American Association for the Advancement of ScienceInstrument Society of AmericaUSA
  2. 2.American Institute of Chemical EngineersUSA
  3. 3.American Society for MetalsInstitute of Food TechnologistsUSA

Personalised recommendations