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  • Douglas M. Considine
  • Glenn D. Considine

Keywords

Verticillium Wilt Food Technology Green Turtle Tomato Juice Texture Profile Analysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas M. Considine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Glenn D. Considine
    • 3
  1. 1.American Association for the Advancement of ScienceInstrument Society of AmericaUSA
  2. 2.American Institute of Chemical EngineersUSA
  3. 3.American Society for MetalsInstitute of Food TechnologistsUSA

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