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  • Douglas M. Considine
  • Glenn D. Considine

Keywords

Protein Efficiency Ratio Emulsifiable Concentrate Poultry Meat Peach Tree Wettable Powder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Di-Syston for Controlling Potato Insects,” Publication CIS 41.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Root-Knot Nematode in Potatoes,” Publication CIS 77.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Thumbnail Cracks in Potatoes,” Publication CS 136.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “An Aid for Determining Stage of Potato Growth,” Publication CIS 186.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Wireworm Control in Irrigated Farms,” Publication CIS 197.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Cropping Rotations,” Publication CIS 200.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Better Potato Stands,” Publication CIS 208.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Fumigation and Early Dying of Potatoes,” Publication CIS 211.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Control of Early Blight of Potato in Eastern and Southeastern Idaho,” Publication CIS 239.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Tissue Analysis-A Guide to Nitrogen Fertilization of Idaho Russet Burbank Potatoes,” Publication 240.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Marketing-Processor Contracts,” Publication CIS 258.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Insect Control,” Publication CIS 260.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Idaho Fertilizer Guide: Potatoes,”Publication CIS 261.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Ring Rot,” Publication CIS 262.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Adjust Potato Harvester Speed to Reduce Bruising,” Publication CIS 263.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Control Weeds in Potatoes with Herbicides,” Publication CIS 290.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Metribuzin for Potato Weed Control,” Publication CIS 291.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Storage Costs and Management,” Publication CIS 297.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Preventing Condensation on the Ceiling of Potato Storages,” Publication CIS 299.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Help in Handling Potato Vines,” Publication CIS 309.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Wireworms-Estimating the Infestations and Damage They Do,” Publication CIS 328.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Modifications to Potato Harvesting and Handling Equipment that can Reduce Bruising,” Publication CIS 330.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Idaho Potato Storage-Construction and Management,” Publication EXP 410.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Leaf and Needle Drop of Evergreen-A Normal Phenomenon,” Publication CIS 327.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Halo Blight,” Publication EXP 444.Google Scholar
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    Staff: The following publications relating to the potato in Idaho, are available from Cooperative Extension Service, College of Agriculture, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho: “Potato Leaf Roll,” Publication EXT 457.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas M. Considine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Glenn D. Considine
    • 3
  1. 1.American Association for the Advancement of ScienceInstrument Society of AmericaUSA
  2. 2.American Institute of Chemical EngineersUSA
  3. 3.American Society for MetalsInstitute of Food TechnologistsUSA

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