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  • Douglas M. Considine
  • Glenn D. Considine

Keywords

Citrus Fruit Olive Tree Sweet Orange Soluble Solid Content Sour Orange 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold Company Inc. 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas M. Considine
    • 1
    • 2
  • Glenn D. Considine
    • 3
  1. 1.American Association for the Advancement of ScienceInstrument Society of AmericaUSA
  2. 2.American Institute of Chemical EngineersUSA
  3. 3.American Society for MetalsInstitute of Food TechnologistsUSA

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