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Computer-aided design for design and craft students

  • J. H. Frazer

Abstract

This paper attempts to identify some of the characteristics of hardware and software which facilitate the introduction of computer-aided design.

The paper begins by relating the background and experience of introducing computer-aided design techniques into an art and design college. Problems of suitable hardware and software are discussed and a justification is made for the adoption of a low-cost graphics work station featuring a small dedicated flat bed plotter instead of a high resolution screen. Approaches to improving the user interface by both hardware and software techniques are described.

The paper concludes by discussing not only some of the advantages accruing from the introduction of computer-aided design techniques, but also by highlighting some of the problems. Three critical questions are posed for the future of computer-aided design education.
  1. 1.

    How to choose suitable hardware and software.

     
  2. 2.

    How to encourage students to accept CAD.

     
  3. 3.

    How to overcome the damages and problems associated with CADED.

     

Keywords

Computer Graphic Command Line Design Education Main Frame Initial Acceptance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Coates, P S and Frazer, J H (1982) The intelligent menu — A proposal for improving the man machine interface. National Academy of Sciences Proceedings of computer/graphics in the building processGoogle Scholar
  2. Coates, P S, Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Scott, A E (1982) Low cost micro processor based draughting systems. Butterworth Scientific Proceedings CAD 82: BrightonGoogle Scholar
  3. Coates, P S, Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Scott, A E (1981) Commercial and educational impact of shape processors. Proceedings computer graphics 81: London Online conferencesGoogle Scholar
  4. Frazer and Connor, J M (1979) A conceptual seeding technique for architectural design. AMK: Berlin Proceedings PArC’79Google Scholar
  5. Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Frazer, P A (1981) New developments in intelligent modelling. Proceedings of computer graphics 81: London Online conferencesGoogle Scholar
  6. Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Frazer, P A (1982) Three dimensional data input devices. National Academy of Sciences Proceedings of computers/graphics in the building process: Washington, USAGoogle Scholar
  7. Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Frazer, P A (1980) Intelligent physical three-dimensional modelling systems. Proceedings of computer graphics 80: Brighton Online conferencesGoogle Scholar
  8. Frazer, J H, Frazer, J M and Frazer, P A (1982) Use of simplified three-dimensional input devices to encourage public participation in design. Butterworth Scientific Proceedings CAD 82: BrightonGoogle Scholar
  9. Goldstein, M (1982) Keynote speech. National Academy of Sciences Proceedings of computer/graphics in the building process: Washington, USAGoogle Scholar
  10. Hayward, S (1974) The computerised studio. Focal Press: New York Computer AnimationGoogle Scholar
  11. Maver, T M (1976) Democracy in decision making. Proceedings of CAD 76Google Scholar
  12. McCrum, J (1982) Computer graphics and the application of artificial intelligence. Ulster PolytechnicGoogle Scholar
  13. Scott, A E, Coates, P S and Frazer, J H (1982) Problem worrying program. Princelet editions Proceedings of levels and boundaries conference: Amsterdam (April 1981)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The CADCAM Association 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Frazer
    • 1
  1. 1.Ulster PolytechnicArt and Design CentreBelfastN Ireland

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