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Significance of Fungal Populations on Foods (Baseline Counts)

  • D. A. A. Mossel
  • H. J. Beckers
  • A. D. KingJr
  • C. B. Anderson
  • L. J. Moberg
  • R. R. Davenport
  • T. Deák
  • V. Tabajdi-Pinter
  • I. Fabri
  • V. Nagel
  • D. A. L. Seiler
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 122)

Abstract

“Baseline” counts are defined as the populations of molds and yeasts that normally occur in wholesome food or feed ingredients. Enumeration of fungal propagules is justified for the following reasons:
  1. 1.

    They provide an indication of compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) conditions during the growing, processing or storage of the food

     
  2. 2.

    High numbers of particular groups or species may indicate that mycotoxins are present

     
  3. 3.

    Even low numbers of propagules of some species may be highly significant and undesirable in some instances (e.g., Zygosaccharomyces bailii in soft drinks or Byssochlamys species in fruit juice).

     

Keywords

Soft Drink Good Manufacturing Practice Fungal Population Microbiological Quality Yeast Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. A. A. Mossel
  • H. J. Beckers
  • A. D. KingJr
  • C. B. Anderson
  • L. J. Moberg
  • R. R. Davenport
  • T. Deák
  • V. Tabajdi-Pinter
  • I. Fabri
  • V. Nagel
  • D. A. L. Seiler

There are no affiliations available

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