Advertisement

Cross Sections and Rate Constants: Results

  • R. E. Johnson

Abstract

In the previous three chapters basic methods for describing atomic and molecular collisions were developed. Although results and calculations were occasionally shown, the emphasis was to obtain the tools needed to understand which processes occur with what probabilities when atoms and molecules collide. In this chapter some experimental results and computations are presented and described in terms of the ideas already developed. The selection of results shown is not at all intended to be comprehensive. It is also somewhat arbitrary, as many excellent experiments have been performed on large numbers of systems and those chosen are not necessarily the “best” results or even the most recent. Those presented are ones with which I was familiar, which elucidate certain ideas already considered and/or will be used in Chapter 6 to discuss macroscopic phenomena. Again I refer the reader to not only the many excellent texts, but also reference tables of atomic and molecular collision results.

Keywords

Impact Parameter Reaction Cross Section Integrate Cross Section Elastic Cross Section Internuclear Separation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Suggested Reading

Elastic Scattering of Ions at High Energies

  1. I. Amdur and J. E. Jordan, in Advances in Chemical Physics, Vol. 10, ed. J. Ross, Wiley, New York (1966), Chapter 2.Google Scholar
  2. J. B. Hasted, Physics of Atomic Collisions, 2nd edn., American Elsevier, New York, (1972), Chapter 10.Google Scholar
  3. K. L. Bell and A. E. Kingstonin Atomic Processes and Applications, ed. P. G. Burke and B. L. Moiseiwitsch, North-Holland, Amsterdam (1976), Chapter 14.Google Scholar

Low-Energy Elastic Scattering of Atoms and Ions

  1. R. B. Bernstein and J. J. Muckerman, in Advances in Chemical Physics, Vol. 12, ed. J. O. Hirschfelder, Wiley, New York (1967), Chapter 8.Google Scholar
  2. U. Buck, in Advances in Chemical Physics, Vol. 30, ed. K. P. Lawley, Wiley, New York (1975), p. 313.Google Scholar
  3. H. S. W. Massey, Electronic and Ionic Impact Phenomena, Vol. 3, 2nd edn., Oxford University Press, London (1974).Google Scholar
  4. H. Pauly and J. P. Toennies, in Advances in Atomic and Molecular Physics, Vol. 1, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1965), Chapter 5.Google Scholar
  5. K. Smith, Calculation of Atomic Collision Processes, Wiley-Interscience, New York (1972).Google Scholar

Diffusion and Mobilities

  1. A. Dalgarno, in Atomic and Molecular Processes, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1962), Chapter 16.Google Scholar
  2. J. O. Hirschfelder, F. Curtiss, and R. B. Bird, Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids, Wiley, New York (1964), Part II.Google Scholar
  3. E. A. Mason, R. J. Munn, and F. J. Smith, in Advances in Atomic and Molecular Physics, Vol. 2, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1966), Chapter 2.Google Scholar

Inelastic Energy Loss: Born, BEA, Electron Gas

  1. U. Fano, Ann. Rev. Nuc. Sci. 13, 1 (1963).Google Scholar
  2. H. A. Bethe and R. Jackiw, Intermediate Quantum Mechanics, 2nd edn., W. A. Benjamin, New York (1968), Part I II.Google Scholar
  3. L. Vriens, in Case Studies in Atomic Collisions, Vol. 1, ed. E. W. McDaniel and M. R. C. McDowell, North-Holland, Amsterdam (1969), p. 337.Google Scholar
  4. D. R. Bates, in Atomic and Molecular Processes, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1962), Chapter 14.Google Scholar
  5. A. Burgess and I. C. Percival, in Advances in Atomic and Molecular Physics, Vol. 4, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1968), p. 109.Google Scholar
  6. D. R. Bates and A. E. Kingston, in Advances in Atomic and Molecular Physics, Vol. 6, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1970) Chapter 6.Google Scholar
  7. J. Lindhard and A. Winther, K. Dan. Vidensk. Selsk. Mat. Fys. Medd., 34,No. 4 (1964).Google Scholar

Potential-Energy Curves and Surfaces

  1. K. P. Lawley, ed., Potential Energy Surfaces, Advances in Chemical Physics, Vol. 42, Wiley, New York (1980).Google Scholar
  2. W. A. Lester, JR., ed. Potential Energy Surfaces in Chemistry, IBM, San Jose, California (1970).Google Scholar

Potential-Energy Curves and Surfaces

  1. E. W. Thomas, Excitation in Heavy-Particle Collisions, Wiley, New York (1972).Google Scholar
  2. Q. C. Kessel, E. Pollack, and W. W. Smith, in Collision Spectroscopy,ed. R. G. Cooks, Plenum Press, New York (1978), Chapter 3; J. T. Parks, ibid.,Chapter 1.Google Scholar

Charge-Exchange Collisions

  1. R. A. Mapleton, Theory of Charge Exchange, Wiley, New York (1972).Google Scholar
  2. R. E. Johnson and J. W. Boring, in Collision Spectroscopy, ed. R. G. Cooks, Plenum Press, New York (1978), Chapter 2; J. Appell, ibid., Chapter 4.Google Scholar

Dissociative Collisions, Incident Ions

  1. G. W. Mcclure and J. M. Peek, Dissociation in Heavy-Particle Collisions, Wiley, New York (1972).Google Scholar
  2. J. Los and T. R. Grovers, in Collision Spectroscopy, ed. R. G. Cooks, Plenum Press, New York (1978), Chapter 6; R. G. Cooks, ibid., Chapter 7.Google Scholar

Atom—Molecule Collisions and Reactions

  1. R. B. Bernstein, ed. Atom—Molecule Collision Theory, Plenum Press, New York (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. R. D. Levine and R. B. Bernstein, Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Oxford University Press, London (1974).Google Scholar
  3. E. E. Nikitin, Theory of Elementary Atomic and Molecular Processes in Gases (translated by M. J. Kearsley from Russian), Oxford University Press, London (1974).Google Scholar
  4. H. K. Shin, in Dynamics of Molecular Collisions, Vol. 2, ed. W. H. Miller, Plenum Press (1976), Chapter 4.Google Scholar

Ion—Molecule Reactions

  1. E. W. Mcdaniel, V. Cermak, A. Dalgarno, E. E. Ferguson, and L. Friedman, Ion—Molecule Reactions, Wiley, New York, (1970).Google Scholar
  2. S. G. Lias and P. Ausloos, Ion—Molecule Reactions, Their Role in Radiation Chemistry, American Chemical Society, Washington, D. C (1975).Google Scholar
  3. R. B. Bernstein and R. D. Levine, Ad. At. Mol. Phy., 11 215 (1975).CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Incident-Electron Collisions

  1. J. B. Hasted, Physics of Atomic Collisions, 2nd edn., American Elsevier, New York (1972), Chapters 4, 5, 6, and 8.Google Scholar
  2. N. F. Mott and H. Massey, The Theory of Atomic Collisions, 3rd edn., Oxford University Press, London (1965), Chapters XVI, XVII, XV III.Google Scholar
  3. H. S. W. Massey and E. H. S. Burhop, Electronic and Ionic Impact Phenomena, Vol. 1, 2nd edn., Oxford University Press, London (1969).Google Scholar
  4. S. Geltman, Topics in Atomic Collision Theory, Academic Press, New York, (1969), Part II.Google Scholar
  5. B. L. Moiseiwitsch, in Lectures in Theoretical Physics, Vol. 3, eds. W. E. Brittin, B. W. Downs, and J. E. Downs, Interscience, New York (1961), p. 142.Google Scholar

Recombination

  1. E. W. McDaniel, Collision Phenomena in Ionized Gases, Wiley, New York (1964), Chapter 12.Google Scholar
  2. H. S. W. Massey and H. B. Gilbody, Electronic and Ionic Impact Phenomena, Vol. 4, 2nd edn., Oxford University Press, London (1974).Google Scholar
  3. J. N. Bardsley and M. A. Biondi, in Advances in Atomic and Molecular Physics, Vol. 6, ed. D. R. Bates, Academic Press, New York (1970), Chapter 1.Google Scholar
  4. M. R. Flannery, in Atomic Processes and Applications, ed. G. Burke and B. L. Moiseiwitsch, North-Holland, Amsterdam (1976), Chapter 12.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

Personalised recommendations