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Leaching Low-Grade Gold Ores

  • J. C. Yannopoulos

Abstract

A dilute cyanide solution is an efficient solvent of gold. However, as in any other leaching process, the solvent has to come in contact with the solid gold particle. Hence, extensive crushing and meticulous two-stage, closed-circuit grinding are needed to liberate the gold particles in the ore. Multistage agitation leaching followed by elaborate solids-liquid separation is required to recover most of the gold (up to approximately 95%) in solution, in a reasonably short time (see Chapter 4). Large tonnage of a relatively high-gold-content ore is a prerequisite for the substantial capital and operating costs required for milling.

Keywords

Leach Solution Cyanide Solution Gold Recovery Gold Extraction Heap Leaching 
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Copyright information

© Van Nostrand Reinhold 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Yannopoulos

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