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Morphological Changes in Animals Following Exposure to Ultrashort Waves (69.7, 155, and 191 MHz) of High Intensity

  • Mariya Sergeevna Tolgskaya
  • Zinaida Vasil’evna Gordon
Part of the Studies in Soviet Science book series (STSS)

Abstract

After a single exposure to ultrashort waves (69.7 MHz, intensities 5000 and 2000 V/m) the animals died with well marked features of hyperthermia. At autopsy severe hyperemia and small hemorrhages were found in the brain and viscera, with well-developed rigor mortis. Microscopic investigations shown marked vascular disturbances in the brain and viscera, with hyperemia and perivascular edema in the lungs, brain, and liver, edema of the myocardial and testicular stroma, and multiple perivascular hemorrhages in the brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, myocardium, and testes. Because death occurred quickly (5 min after irradiation in an intensity of 5000 V/m), degenerative changes had not had time to develop in the viscera and they were slight in degree. Acute swelling of the cytoplasm was observed in the nerve cells in various parts of the brain. After irradiation with ultrashort waves in an intensity of 2000 V/m the animals survived rather longer (up to 3 h), and the picture of vascular disturbances as described above was accompanied by degenerative changes in the nerve cells of the brain and viscera which were rather more clearly defined, and consisted of swelling and vacuolation of the cytoplasm of nerve cells in the thalamus and hypothalamus. Marked argyrophilia and irregular swellings and pools of axoplasm were found in the sensory nerve fibers of the skin and sensory fibrils of the myocardium, intestine, urinary bladder, esophagus, and elsewhere (Fig. 11c).

Copyright information

© Consultants Bureau, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariya Sergeevna Tolgskaya
    • 1
  • Zinaida Vasil’evna Gordon
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Labor Hygiene and Occupational DiseasesAcademy of Medical Sciences of the USSRMoscowUSSR

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