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Electron Beam Controlled CO2 Lasers at Los Alamos

  • K. Boyer
  • Ralph Cooper

Abstract

The concept of using lasers to compress and heat thermonuclear fuel to ignition relies on high-energy short-pulse lasers. To apply this idea to commercial power plants requires lasers of still higher energy (105 J or more) meeting other performance and economic constraints. At present, the CO2 laser is the only one that has reached a stage at which the development of 105-J systems appears to be a relatively straightforward and economically practical engineering effort. This paper describes the work at Los Alamos1,2 on electron-beam-controlled CO2 lasers, including the development of a single-beam 103-J laser, the design of an eight-beam 104-J system, and the research supporting these efforts. The experimental work reported here was conducted by members of the CO2 Laser Group under C. Fenstermacher and the bulk of the theoretical effort by a group under R. Morse. Contributors are too numerous to list here but some credits are given in the references, with publications where available. Some additional details are available in the Laser Program Progress Reports.1,2

Keywords

Nanosecond Pulse Rotational Relaxation Amplifier Stage Rotational Relaxation Time Alamos Scientific Laboratory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Boyer
    • 1
  • Ralph Cooper
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos Scientific LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaLos AlamosUSA

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