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Action of Bicarbonate on Photosynthetic Electron Transport in the Presence or Absence of Inhibitory Anions

  • Julian J. Eaton-Rye
  • Danny J. Blubaugh
  • Govindjee

Abstract

Bicarbonate (or CO2) was shown by Warburg and Krippahl [1] to stimulate electron transport during the Hill reaction. This phenomenon has been referred to as the bicarbonate (HCO3 ) effect. The electron transport chain can be dissected into a number of clearly defined partial reactions through the addition of specific inhibitors and electron donors and acceptors. By applying this approach (see e.g., [2, 3]) the HCO3 effect has been shown to be associated with the acceptor side of Photosystem II (PS II):
$${{H}_{2}}O\to OEC\to Z\to P680\to Pheo\to {{Q}_{A}}\to {{Q}_{B}}\to PQ$$
(1)

Keywords

Acceptor Side Hill Reaction Spinach Thylakoid Anion Binding Site Photosynthetic Electron Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julian J. Eaton-Rye
    • 1
  • Danny J. Blubaugh
    • 1
  • Govindjee
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant BiologyUrbanaUSA

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