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Nutrient Uptake and Acclimation to Soil Waterlogging and Oxygen Shortage in Non-Wetland Plants

  • M. C. Drew

Abstract

Non-wetland crop species can experience temporary flooding or waterlogging in widely different climatic zones of the world. Such flooding may originate either from poor soil drainage following irrigation or heavy rain, or from a rising water-table because of net water movement into the soil profile from adjacent land (Van’t Woudt and Hagan, 1957). When soil temperatures are high, which is often the case during irrigation in semi-arid climates, the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the soil water is exhausted, often within a few hours (Ioannou, Schneider and Grogan, 1977), with deleterious consequences for plant growth and yields. Even in more temperate climates in NW Europe, the concentration of oxygen in the soil water slowly declines and characteristic symptoms of waterlogging injury occur (Cannell and Jackson, 1981).

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Copyright information

© Donal D. Hook 1988

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  • M. C. Drew

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