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Soil Formation under Hydromorphic Conditions

  • S. W. Buol
  • R. A. Rebertus

Abstract

Soil wetness has long been recognised as an important consideration in land use, and nearly every soil classification scheme has differentiated wet soils from dry soils (Smith, 1973). Wetlands imply wetness, that is water-saturated conditions that occur for at least part of the year. Soils developed in the presence of enough moisture to cause anoxia are termed hydromorphic. Contrasted with hydromorphic is the adjective hydric, which means to be characterised by, or require, an abundance of moisture. As such, hydric is usually used to describe a moist habitat or a vegetational physiognomy indicative of moistness, but not a soil changed by high water content.

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Copyright information

© Donal D. Hook 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. W. Buol
  • R. A. Rebertus

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