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Selection of Cases and Attributes Plans

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

While the overall philosophy of this book is to control microbial hazards through raw material selection, Good Hygienic Practices (GHP) and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP), and not to rely on microbiological testing, there are occasions when testing might be considered. If it is concluded that testing is appropriate, this chapter provides guidance on the choice of sampling plan and discusses their limitations. The recommended sampling plans are based on statistical considerations in Chapters 6 and 7, the severity of the hazard, and the potential for change in risk (decrease, no change, or increase) before a food is consumed. The International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF) recommended 15 cases that reflect different levels of risk (ICMSF, 1974, 1986). The greater the risk, the higher the case number, the more stringent the sampling plan (see section 8.5 and Table 8-1).

Keywords

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Sampling Plan Foodborne Disease Foodborne Illness Aerobic Plate Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. ACMSF (Advisory Committee on Microbiological Safety of Food, UK) (1995). Report on Foodborne Viral Infections. London: HMSO.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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