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Establishment of Microbiological Criteria for Lot Acceptance

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

As described in the previous chapter, microbiological criteria represent one form of acceptance criteria. This chapter will focus on the use of microbiological criteria as a basis for determining acceptability of individual lots or consignments of food. Other uses of microbiological testing will not be addressed in this chapter.

Keywords

World Trade Organization Sampling Plan Analytical Unit Indicator Organism Critical Control Point 
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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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