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Meeting the FSO through Control Measures

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

Effective food safety management systems are designed to meet:
  • • FSOs established by control authorities through the risk management processes or

  • • objectives established by food processors during the development of a HACCP plan.

These objectives are achieved through the application of control measures intended to prevent, eliminate, or reduce microbiological hazards such as those discussed in this chapter.

Keywords

Performance Criterion Typhoid Fever Human Brucellosis Critical Control Point Microbiological Safety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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