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Listeria monocytogenes in Cooked Sausage (Frankfurters)

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

This chapter considers Listeria monocytogenes in cooked sausage (i.e., frankfurters) as an example of a microbial hazard that is capable of growth in a wide variety of perishable ready-to-eat (RTE) foods. The use of performance criteria, process criteria, and validation in relation to the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) plan is described. In addition, the importance of Good Hygienic Practices (GHP) and an example of a sampling program to assess control of a pathogen in the environment is discussed. In this example, the pathogen of concern is psychrotrophic and can establish itself as a resident and multiply in the refrigerated areas of the food operation, as well as in the refrigerated food. This chapter describes the application of principles introduced in previous chapters. Hypothetical values are used throughout the chapter wherever assumptions were necessary to illustrate a concept or procedure. No attempt has been made to validate their accuracy.

Keywords

Performance Criterion Listeria Monocytogenes Ground Beef Meat Emulsion Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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