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Salmonella in Dried Milk

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

Milk is widely used worldwide as an important part of the diet, especially for younger children. Raw milk is a very perishable product and efforts to preserve it have led to the development of a range of dairy products (Anon., 1995). One of the earliest means of preserving milk was natural fermentation (ICMSF, 1998), but modern technologies have improved the old preservation methods and added new ones (Robinson, 1986a, b; Varnam & Sutherland, 1994; ICMSF, 1998 at Chap. 16). In particular, drying has devel-oped into one of the most used technologies. In addition to preserving the most nutritious elements, drying offers the advantage of weight reduction, making transportation more convenient. Dried milk has been shipped in large quantities around the world for decades. In many tropical countries, producing and/or importing dried milk provides children with this nutritious food.

Keywords

Performance Criterion Sampling Plan Hygienic Measure Aerobic Plate Count Dairy Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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