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Experience in the Use of Two-Class Attributes Plans for Lot Acceptance

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

The first portion of this chapter is slightly updated from Chapter 6, Book 2 of the International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods (ICMSF, 1986). Very little of the text has been changed because the principles still hold true. Although the text is largely concerned with Salmonella in a variety of foods, the concepts also apply to other pathogens where presence/absence tests are applied and c = 0. The chapter from Book 2 is historically significant because when it was written, there was an increasing awareness and concern for Salmonella in a wide variety of foods, many of which were ready-to-eat. In response to this concern, a zero tolerance policy was applied by control authorities. Some companies buying ingredients from suppliers subsequently adopted this practice. As methods improved and the quantity of food analyzed increased, lower level of contamination could be detected.

Keywords

Sample Unit Sampling Plan Analytical Unit Filler Head Zero Tolerance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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