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Microbiological Hazards and Their Control

  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

Abstract

The purpose of this book is to introduce the reader to a structured approach for managing food safety, including sampling and microbiological testing. In addition, the text outlines how to meet specific food safety goals for a food or process using Good Hygienic Practices (GHP) and the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP) systems.

Keywords

Domoic Acid Foodborne Disease Foodborne Illness Microbiological Safety Infectious Intestinal Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

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  • International Commission on Microbiological Specifications for Foods Staff

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