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Reaction Time in Vascular (Multiinfarct) Dementia

  • Gunther Ladurner
  • Marianne Tschinkel
  • Hedwig Klebl
  • Helmut Lechner

Abstract

Reaction time (RT) is a physiological measurement which has been found to increase with age and cerebral disease (Benton 1977). For the increase in RT in cerebral disease (Klensch 1973), the particular localisation of the lesion (Benton and Joynt, 1958; Howes and Boller 1975) as well as dementing processes have been considered to be responsible (Miller 1974; Pirozzolo et al., 1981). However, it still remains unknown whether the RT is related to diffuse or focal brain disease or is caused by the loss of mental capabilities. To clarify the situation it seems therefore of interest to investigate patients with cerebrovascular disease (CVD) in whom all relevant parameters, focal lesions in the non-dominant and dominant hemispheres as well as dementing processes could be studied.

Keywords

Brain Disease Dominant Hemisphere Cerebral Disease Mental Capability Focal Neurological Symptom 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunther Ladurner
    • 1
  • Marianne Tschinkel
    • 1
  • Hedwig Klebl
    • 1
  • Helmut Lechner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and NeurologyUniversity GrazGrazAustria

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