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Event-Related Potentials and Cognitive Deficits in Schizophrenia

  • Tomomichi Kameyama
  • Osamu Saitoh
  • Ken-Ichi Hiramatsu
  • Shin-Ichi Niwa
  • Karen Rymar
  • Kenji Itoh

Abstract

Measurements of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) have been utilized in studies on attentional functioning. Hink, Hillyard and Benson (1978) recorded ERPs during syllable discrimination tasks, and found that the N100 component in normal subjects was enhanced to all stimuli in the attended ear, while the P300 component was enhanced only to the “target” stimuli in that ear. Based on these results, they hypothesized that the N100 component correlated with the ‘stimulus set’, while the P300 component correlated to the ‘ response set’ as defined by Broadbent (1971). Accordingly, ERP measurements are considered to be a useful method for clarifying the pathophysiological bases underlying those diseases that display disturbed attentional functioning. A number of studies measuring ERPs in schizophrenics has already been reported (Levit et al., 1973; Shagass et al., 1978; Roth et al., 1981; Saitoh et al., in press). These reports are nearly consistent in that schizophrenics demonstrate a reduction in P300 amplitudes.

Keywords

Target Stimulus P300 Amplitude P300 Component Attentional Functioning N100 Component 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tomomichi Kameyama
    • 1
  • Osamu Saitoh
    • 1
  • Ken-Ichi Hiramatsu
    • 1
  • Shin-Ichi Niwa
    • 1
  • Karen Rymar
    • 1
  • Kenji Itoh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeuropsychiatryFaculty of Medicine University of TokyoBunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113Japan

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