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Neuroendocrine Involvement in Therapeutic Mechanisms of Neuroleptic and Antidepressant Drugs: Studies of Thyroid Axis

  • G. Langer
  • H. Aschauer
  • M. S. Keshaven
  • G. Koinig
  • F. Resch
  • G. Schoenbeck

Summary

Sixty-five depressed and 33 paranoid hallucinatory patients were investigated longitudinally for one year to assess short- and long term therapeutic outcome with antidepressant and neuroleptic drugs, respectively. The patients’ thyrotropin (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) was studied at admission, during inpatient treatment and at discharge. Decreased TSH responses at outcome, and normalisation of these pathological responses during treatment were associated with the highest chance for recovery. TSH responses which persisted blunted at discharge were associated with a higher relapse rate during the one year following. It is hypothesized that the blunted TSH response may reflect a nonspecific cerebral malactivation, which is disactivated by the therapeutic effects of neuroleptic and antidepressant drugs.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Antidepressant Drug Thyrotropin Release Hormone Biological Psychiatry Neuroleptic Drug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Langer
    • 1
  • H. Aschauer
    • 1
  • M. S. Keshaven
    • 1
  • G. Koinig
    • 1
  • F. Resch
    • 1
  • G. Schoenbeck
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryViennaAustria

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