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Biological Markers and Antidepressant Treatment Response

  • David G. Ostrow
  • Anna Okonek
  • Robert Gibbons
  • Richard Cooper
  • John M. Davis

Abstract

The use of biological markers to predict antidepressant treatment response may lead to more rational selection of specific drugs for individual patients. Research must first determine which biological measurements have the requisite properties to serve as reliable guides to treatment selection before those markers can be tested for their predictive abilities. Those properties include ease of performance, reliability and reproducibility of the measurement, insensitivity or predictable response to “background” physiological variables, ability to differentiate meaningful subgroups of depressed patients, and cost effectiveness. In this paper we review the status of several biological markers being developed as potential predictors of antidepressant treatment response. Although biological marker research is primarily concerned wtih predicting response to drug treatment, it may also prove to be useful in predicting which depressed patients may respond best to psychological or combined biological and psychological treatments.

Keywords

Depressed Patient Biological Marker Dexamethasone Suppression Test Discriminant Function Analysis Cortisol Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • David G. Ostrow
    • 1
    • 2
  • Anna Okonek
    • 1
    • 2
  • Robert Gibbons
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
  • John M. Davis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Community Health & Preventive MedicineNorthwestern University Medical School, VA Lakside Medical CenterChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Department of ResearchIllinois State Psychiatric InstituteChicagoUSA

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