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Extinction Failure in Classical Conditioning as a Mechanism of Psychosomatic Illness

  • Archie Levey
  • Irene Martin
  • Robert Blizard
  • Matthew Cobb

Abstract

Momentary phasic alterations of visceral activity are a normal accompaniment of external stimulation. A particular organ system which is hyper-reactive to stimulation will readily become conditioned to the contexts and antecedents which are associated with that stimulation. If the resultant conditioned responding persists, that is if it fails to extinguish, the organ system is at risk for psychophysiological disorder.

Keywords

Classical Conditioning Galvanic Skin Response General Arousal Interval Response Psychosomatic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Archie Levey
    • 1
  • Irene Martin
    • 2
  • Robert Blizard
    • 2
  • Matthew Cobb
    • 2
  1. 1.MRC Applied Psychology UnitCambridge CB2USA
  2. 2.Institute of PsychiatryLondonUK

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