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Heredity-Environment in Schizophrenia

  • F. Schulsinger
  • J. Parnas
  • H. Schulsinger
  • Th. W. Teasdale
  • S. A. Mednick

Abstract

Is there a real profit of learning about the genetic liability for schizophrenia? The answer is, to some extent, YES. The knowledge about the strength of the liability, and of the mode of genetic transmission justifies the search for the biological mechanisms being active in this genetic transmission — be they metabolic or neurophysiological. In addition, the knowledge of a genetic liability makes it possible to compose a group of subjects for research in which a higher outcome of schizophrenia than the average one percent can be expected — in other words: a high risk group.

Keywords

Ventricular Size Genetic Transmission Soft Neurological Sign Genetic Liability Birth Complication 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Schulsinger
    • 1
  • J. Parnas
    • 1
  • H. Schulsinger
    • 2
  • Th. W. Teasdale
    • 1
  • S. A. Mednick
    • 1
  1. 1.Psykologisk Institut, Dept. of PsychiatryKommunehospitaletCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Institute of Clinical PsychologyUniversity of CopenhagenDenmark

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