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Biochemical Characterization of Natural Killer Cytotoxic Factors

  • Susan C. Wright
  • Stanley M. Wilbur
  • Benjamin Bonavida
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 187)

Abstract

Earlier studies of the NK lytic mechanism produced evidence for the stimulus secretion model and led to the postulation that lytic mediators are transferred from the effector to the target cell (1). Subsequent work in our laboratory demonstrated that soluble natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF) can be detected in the supernatants of effector cells stimulated with NK targets or with lectin (2,3). Further experiments were performed to analyze the functional characteristics of these factors. It was found that NKCF are released from human PBL (4) or murine spleen cells (2) that bear the phenotypic characteristics of NK cells. Release of NKCF is inhibited by some of the same protease inhibitors (5) shown previously to inhibit NK CMC (6). Pretreatment of effector cells with interferon enhances the release of NKCF (7) whereas interferon pretreatment of YAC-1 cells impairs their ability to stimulate release of the factors (8), thus accounting for the dual effects of interferon on NK CMC (9). NKCF lyse only NK sensitive targets (2,4) and YAC-1 variants selected for resistance to NKCF are also resistant to NK CMC (10).

Keywords

Natural Killer Lytic Activity Natural Killer Activity Carbohydrate Determinant Target Cell Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan C. Wright
    • 1
  • Stanley M. Wilbur
    • 1
    • 2
  • Benjamin Bonavida
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyUCLA School of MedicineLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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